HEADLINES

  • Commission concerned over districts

    County commissioner Randy Dallke expressed concern regarding possible restructuring of Marion County’s commission districts. “How we come up and divide this is a very interesting question,” he said. “Providing better representation should be the goal.”

  • 'Florence nearing water deal' council member says

    Florence city council held a 40-minute executive session at Monday’s meeting to discuss the lease regarding Crystal Springs. The council was present, along with mayor Bob Gayle and city attorney Randy Pankratz.

  • Bank account transfers led to charges

    A year and three months before Teresa Huffman retired as county economic development director, she allegedly drained the assets of two inactive charitable groups she’d overseen and deposited the money into an account for a third inactive program. A year after her retirement, she allegedly moved that money into her personal bank account and used part of it to buy herself a mobile home and camper.

  • Funding source uncertain for one non-profit

    Leadership Marion County and Leadership Marion County Children’s Foundation were originally funded in 2009 by the Kansas Health Foundation, who gave Central Kansas Community Foundation a $100,000 endowment to equally fund both programs, according to Chase Willhite, KHF assistant vice president for communications. CKCF, which still has a donation portal for the programs on its website, is the manager of the money for the initiative.

  • Teen center 'Hub' of Peabody community

    All roads lead to a hub — in this case, the Hub, a not-for-profit youth center in downtown Peabody. Director Isaac Good, the only paid employee, said the purpose of the center is to be a safe haven for youth of Peabody and surrounding counties.

OTHER HEADLINES

  • Plowing snow is just part of the job

    Sherri Pankratz of Lincolnville might be a senior engineering technician for Kansas Department of Transportation, but that doesn’t mean she can’t do hands-on work when required. “When the snow flies, there’s a good chance I’m on call,” she said.

  • Fall leaves have many uses around the home

    By the time autumn hits full swing, many trees will have shed their leaves for the season, and the last vestiges of red, yellow and orange magic will have faded to brown. Raking, blowing and collecting leaves becomes the primary chores of lawn and yard maintenance, and presents most homeowners with large piles of gathered leaves to tend to. It is impossible to count just how many leaves fall to the ground each year, or just how many pounds of leaves get collected curbside, but the numbers are substantial. Cleaning up leaves is considerable work, but not all of those leaves need to be carted away. In fact, there are several different uses of leaves that can be beneficial.

  • Marion grad plays leading role in Tabor play

    Performing on stage in front of an audience was nothing new to Victoria “Tori” Boyd of Marion, but being part of a Broadway musical at Tabor College last week took her performance to a new level. The 2017 Marion High School graduate participated in theater all four high school years and played two leading roles her senior year — Rosie in “Bye, Bye, Birdie” and Etta Greenleaf in “The Werewolf’s Curse.”

  • Vocalist performs in black box theater

    What do you call a theater that is a big, square box with black walls, black ceiling, and black backdrops? At Tabor College, it is named Prieb-Harder Black Box Theater. Located in Shari Flaming Center for the Arts, it has a flat floor and multiple uses, including as a practice room for theatrical performances and recitals.

HOME

  • County Seat celebrates 40th anniversary

    County Seat Decorating Center in Marion has a different focus from when Jeannie and Brad Wildin bought the business as 22 year-olds. When the couple purchased it from Walt Oelschlager in 1978, the business was centered around furniture, with limited flooring options.

  • Fall leaves have many uses around the home

    By the time autumn hits full swing, many trees will have shed their leaves for the season, and the last vestiges of red, yellow and orange magic will have faded to brown. Raking, blowing and collecting leaves becomes the primary chores of lawn and yard maintenance, and presents most homeowners with large piles of gathered leaves to tend to. It is impossible to count just how many leaves fall to the ground each year, or just how many pounds of leaves get collected curbside, but the numbers are substantial. Cleaning up leaves is considerable work, but not all of those leaves need to be carted away. In fact, there are several different uses of leaves that can be beneficial.

DEATH

DOCKET

OPINION

  • Who's left holding the bag?

    Teresa Huffman’s arrest on charges of misusing public money offers important lessons that go well beyond whether she is trustworthy. Huffman is, of course, innocent until proved guilty. That’s not true of the system that created the possibility of her guilt.

  • County's new math: 3 + 2 = 1 ÷ 5

    The more the county talks about adding two more commissioners, the sillier the idea seems. Rather than solve the seriously fractured nature of the current commission, adding two more voices would seem unlikely to resolve the cacophony of discord that prevents commissioners from meaningfully governing. Historically, the best county commissioners have been the ones who look out for county interests as a whole rather than pursue agendas that further their individual districts.

  • A few more catty comments

    If you think your life is challenging, try being the ball of fur that occasionally allows me to share her queen-size bed in the home she daily patrols and so carefully decorates with small tufts of hair. Yesterday was a traumatic day for both of us. After an intense period of negotiation that included overturning a sofa and un-clenching toenails buried into carpet, we experienced 10 minutes of mournful moaning en route to a gaggle of white-coated people intent on poking, prodding, and eventually jabbing her with needles.

  • ANOTHER DAY IN THE COUNTRY:

    That old bridge at Jacob's Crossing

PEOPLE

  • Hardware store still going strong

    For nearly 20 years Peabody Hardware and Lumber, under the ownership of Mark and Ginger Whitney, has provided for the community’s needs supplying everything from pipes, to hot water heaters, to paint. In 1999 the Whitneys purchased the business.

  • Intern starts writing career

    Cassandra Stinger, a homeschooled senior from Peabody, has joined Marion County Record staff of writers to get her feet wet in the journalism world. Cassie wants to be an investigative reporter “when she grows up,” but before she can get to that level, she’ll need to learn basic news writing including human interest stories.

  • Getting ready for "Coming home for Christmas" event

    The Peabody Christmas committee is accepting donations of large, non-breakable Christmas tree decorations and garland for its “Coming home for Christmas” celebration Dec. 1 in downtown Peabody. Donations will be accepted by committee members Denae Pickens, Rachel Wattson, Ann Leppke, Hope Reynolds, Tiana Gains, Mollie Partridge, Jenny Hurst and Traci Woodruff.

  • Deines family has reunion

    The family of Phillip Deines Sr. held its 33rd family reunion Oct. 14 at Lincolnville’s community building for a basket dinner. Attending from Ramona were Merv and Leona Deines, Terry and Julie Deines; Dylan, Carly, and Makenzi Deines, and Jeff Deines.

  • UPCOMING:

    Calendar of events
  • SENIOR CENTER:

    Peabody Senior Center menu

SCHOOL

MORE…

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