HEADLINES

  • Florence seeks to seize springs

    An ongoing water fight between Florence City Council members and owners of a spring that has supplied city water for 98 years has ratcheted up and is likely headed toward a court battle. Council members voted Monday to begin eminent domain proceedings to seize ownership of four acres owned by the DeForest family at Crystal Springs, where the city’s springhouse is situated. Council member Trayce Warner was the lone vote in opposition.

  • Tit-for-tat leads to a bit of a snit

    Tempers briefly flared during a nearly 20-minute discussion Monday of whether county and city of Peabody crews might be able to exchange work on two unrelated projects. The city and county jointly own a quarter-mile stretch of Old Mill Rd. south of Peabody’s new Dollar General store at US-50.

  • Sitting high on the horse

    “You have to live on a farm and own an animal to be in 4-H,” — a common misconception. Because of it, many youths don’t take advantage of the program. Marion’s Happy Hustler 4-H members Abree, 9, and Paige Ensey, 12, aren’t typical horse members. They live in town and, because of city ordinances, are not allowed to keep horses on their property.

  • Council votes to raise mill levy

    “I don’t want to raise the mill levy anymore than you do,” Mayor Larry Larson told city council members at last night’s budget workshop. However, the council voted 4-1 to propose increasing the tax rate by 2.3 percent. They set a public hearing on the budget for 6:30 p.m. Aug. 13 at city hall.

  • Dog injures Peabody man

    A Peabody man was bitten on the face by a dog Monday night but refused medical treatment for profuse bleeding. Peabody police chief Bruce Burke said police were summoned to the 300 block of Vine St. at 7:45 p.m. An ambulance also was summoned.

  • Moving ahead with running backward

    Winning running medals was not uncommon for Aaron Yoder in high school, but doing it running backward is relatively new. The latest medals were won by him and his family earlier this month at the world championships in retro-running in Bologna, Italy. Yoder attended Peabody-Burns through fifth grade. He transferred to Hillsboro when his father became elementary principal there. He graduated from Hillsboro High School in 2004 after setting records in the regular 1500m, 800m, mile, and cross-country.

OTHER HEADLINES

  • Half of county workers 'underpaid'

    A new, $17,997 study of whether the county pays its employees enough began last week with a consultant telling commissioners that 49 percent of county starting salaries were below the midpoint of minimums paid by 27 other organizations she had studied. But she declined to identify for commissioners or the public what those organizations were.

  • How dream jobs evolve

    Joining our staff this week is reporter Alex Simone from the State University of New York at Oswego. We asked him to introduce himself. By ALEXANDER SIMONE Staff writer What separates a career from a job? What differentiates the employment opportunity of a lifetime from the nine-to-five slog?

  • Legislator opposed tax lid

    The state’s tax lid, championed by former Gov. Sam Brownback and now causing concerns as Marion County prepares its budget, was a bad idea, according to one of Marion County’s state legislators. “The tax lid is supposed to do exactly that, lower property taxes,” said State Rep. Don Schroeder, R-Hesston, who represents Hillsboro, Peabody, and the southern portion of Marion County.

DEATHS

  • Kathryn Lunderman

    Services for Kathryn Mae Lunderman, 93, who died Friday at Salina Regional Medical Center, were to have been today at Eastmoor United Methodist Church with burial at White Chapel Memorial Gardens, Wichita. Born May 1, 1925, in Quinter to John Tillman and Cora Bell (Boitnott) Webster, she worked as a riveter on B-29s at Boeing during World War II.

  • Freddie Mosiman

    Services for former Peabody-area resident Fred Mosiman III, 63, who died July 11 at Botkin Care and Rehabilitation Center in Wellington, will be 2 p.m. Saturday at Baker Funeral Home Wichita chapel. Born Jan. 18, 1955, in Newton, to Freddie Mossiman Jr. and Ruth Mosiman, he grew up on a farm near Peabody.

  • IN MEMORIAM:

    Irvin McPheeters
  • IN MEMORIAM:

    Reuben Zerger

DOCKET

HEALTH

  • From Burdick to Boston: A new start at a new college

    “I’m very scared,” she said. “It’s going to be a big change, but I’ve traveled a lot, so I think I can adjust easily.” Sattler, a Christian-based college is situated in two floors of a business building. Dorms take up two floors of a nearby apartment building.

  • An early start on post-secondary education

    “I earned credits in freshman English and algebra,” she said. She sought out extra-curricular things to enhance her education, including a Duke Talent Identification program that allows gifted students to choose various summer experiences.

  • Future course wide open for Marion grad

    He is living and working in Wichita while taking classes at the Andover campus of Butler Community College. “It’s a little scary thinking about becoming an adult,” he said. “But at the same time, it’s exciting to explore all my options and see what I can do.”

  • Grad sees future in counseling and firefighting

    His counselor, Ken Parry, convinced him early in high school to change his path. “He helped me realize I am better with people than in building,” Bailey said.

  • SENIOR CENTER:

    Peabody Senior Menu
  • WONSEVU:

    Residents entertain visitors

SCHOOL/SPORTS

  • Team finishes season at state

    A local traveling team of 14-year-olds, Battle Baseball, finished its season July 13 and 14 at the National Baseball Congress state tournament in Hayes. Team players were from Hillsboro, Herington, Peabody, and Marion.

HEADLINES

  • Florence seeks to seize springs

    An ongoing water fight between Florence City Council members and owners of a spring that has supplied city water for 98 years has ratcheted up and is likely headed toward a court battle. Council members voted Monday to begin eminent domain proceedings to seize ownership of four acres owned by the DeForest family at Crystal Springs, where the city’s springhouse is situated. Council member Trayce Warner was the lone vote in opposition.

  • Tit-for-tat leads to a bit of a snit

    Tempers briefly flared during a nearly 20-minute discussion Monday of whether county and city of Peabody crews might be able to exchange work on two unrelated projects. The city and county jointly own a quarter-mile stretch of Old Mill Rd. south of Peabody’s new Dollar General store at US-50.

  • Sitting high on the horse

    “You have to live on a farm and own an animal to be in 4-H,” — a common misconception. Because of it, many youths don’t take advantage of the program. Marion’s Happy Hustler 4-H members Abree, 9, and Paige Ensey, 12, aren’t typical horse members. They live in town and, because of city ordinances, are not allowed to keep horses on their property.

  • Council votes to raise mill levy

    “I don’t want to raise the mill levy anymore than you do,” Mayor Larry Larson told city council members at last night’s budget workshop. However, the council voted 4-1 to propose increasing the tax rate by 2.3 percent. They set a public hearing on the budget for 6:30 p.m. Aug. 13 at city hall.

  • Dog injures Peabody man

    A Peabody man was bitten on the face by a dog Monday night but refused medical treatment for profuse bleeding. Peabody police chief Bruce Burke said police were summoned to the 300 block of Vine St. at 7:45 p.m. An ambulance also was summoned.

  • Moving ahead with running backward

    Winning running medals was not uncommon for Aaron Yoder in high school, but doing it running backward is relatively new. The latest medals were won by him and his family earlier this month at the world championships in retro-running in Bologna, Italy. Yoder attended Peabody-Burns through fifth grade. He transferred to Hillsboro when his father became elementary principal there. He graduated from Hillsboro High School in 2004 after setting records in the regular 1500m, 800m, mile, and cross-country.

OTHER HEADLINES

  • Half of county workers 'underpaid'

    A new, $17,997 study of whether the county pays its employees enough began last week with a consultant telling commissioners that 49 percent of county starting salaries were below the midpoint of minimums paid by 27 other organizations she had studied. But she declined to identify for commissioners or the public what those organizations were.

  • How dream jobs evolve

    Joining our staff this week is reporter Alex Simone from the State University of New York at Oswego. We asked him to introduce himself. By ALEXANDER SIMONE Staff writer What separates a career from a job? What differentiates the employment opportunity of a lifetime from the nine-to-five slog?

  • Legislator opposed tax lid

    The state’s tax lid, championed by former Gov. Sam Brownback and now causing concerns as Marion County prepares its budget, was a bad idea, according to one of Marion County’s state legislators. “The tax lid is supposed to do exactly that, lower property taxes,” said State Rep. Don Schroeder, R-Hesston, who represents Hillsboro, Peabody, and the southern portion of Marion County.

DEATHS

  • Kathryn Lunderman

    Services for Kathryn Mae Lunderman, 93, who died Friday at Salina Regional Medical Center, were to have been today at Eastmoor United Methodist Church with burial at White Chapel Memorial Gardens, Wichita. Born May 1, 1925, in Quinter to John Tillman and Cora Bell (Boitnott) Webster, she worked as a riveter on B-29s at Boeing during World War II.

  • Freddie Mosiman

    Services for former Peabody-area resident Fred Mosiman III, 63, who died July 11 at Botkin Care and Rehabilitation Center in Wellington, will be 2 p.m. Saturday at Baker Funeral Home Wichita chapel. Born Jan. 18, 1955, in Newton, to Freddie Mossiman Jr. and Ruth Mosiman, he grew up on a farm near Peabody.

  • IN MEMORIAM:

    Irvin McPheeters
  • IN MEMORIAM:

    Reuben Zerger

DOCKET

HEALTH

  • From Burdick to Boston: A new start at a new college

    “I’m very scared,” she said. “It’s going to be a big change, but I’ve traveled a lot, so I think I can adjust easily.” Sattler, a Christian-based college is situated in two floors of a business building. Dorms take up two floors of a nearby apartment building.

  • An early start on post-secondary education

    “I earned credits in freshman English and algebra,” she said. She sought out extra-curricular things to enhance her education, including a Duke Talent Identification program that allows gifted students to choose various summer experiences.

  • Future course wide open for Marion grad

    He is living and working in Wichita while taking classes at the Andover campus of Butler Community College. “It’s a little scary thinking about becoming an adult,” he said. “But at the same time, it’s exciting to explore all my options and see what I can do.”

  • Grad sees future in counseling and firefighting

    His counselor, Ken Parry, convinced him early in high school to change his path. “He helped me realize I am better with people than in building,” Bailey said.

  • SENIOR CENTER:

    Peabody Senior Menu
  • WONSEVU:

    Residents entertain visitors

SCHOOL/SPORTS

  • Team finishes season at state

    A local traveling team of 14-year-olds, Battle Baseball, finished its season July 13 and 14 at the National Baseball Congress state tournament in Hayes. Team players were from Hillsboro, Herington, Peabody, and Marion.

MORE…

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