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  • Last modified 299 days ago (Oct. 27, 2016)

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Time to learn about that special tax

If you have been swamped with social media memes about the presidential candidates, been the recipient of huge-sized post cards of Republicans and Democrats for office in just about every slot in Kansas, or have been tempted to never again speak to a former close friend because of his or her political affiliation, welcome to the world of “Stink-O Politics.”

Actually, when I took this temporary six-month job nearly 16 years ago, Bill Myer assured me I would never have to write an opinion about any political figure unless he or she was making an appearance in Peabody. Boy, that sounded like a deal to me.

Since no has told me the rules have changed I assume I am still barred from mentioning what our presidential candidates are doing since they have not decided to do it here. Can you imagine a rally for either one at Pop’s Diner?

However, we all still need to show up at the polls Nov. 8. Peabody residents will have choices to make that will likely have long-term effects on the community. In addition to deciding who will run our county, state, and nation, there will be a question on the ballot about resurrecting a one percent sales tax on retail sales in the city limits.

While the tax will not be in force until the end of time, it will last for 10 years. The money can only be spent on Peabody streets and provides a fairly painless way to generate enough to make substantial repairs to that part of our infrastructure.

The 2006 city council put the question to the voters and the measure was approved. The 10-year period for that tax expires Dec. 31 of this year. If voters approve it again, it will go into effect in April, 2017. More than $575,000 was generated for street maintenance and repair during the initial taxing phase.

Our streets take a daily beating. The weight of trash, grain, and delivery trucks as well as overnight semis that go in and out destroy the surfaces. This is a tax that others help us pay. People who shop here, eat here, or pay for services here, but live elsewhere, contribute to the tax that repairs our streets.

The council unanimously approved bringing this matter to Peabody voters in May. The choice is now ours. Pay a little extra at the checkout counter for a few years and have enough money to maintain and repair our streets? Or hang on to that penny and grumble about the potholes, standing water, broken asphalt, and crumbling gutters forever more? Receive some outside funding or raise the local mill levy in a few years to pay for adequate streets?

You see, it is not all about Hilary and The Donald or even all the bums in Kansas government. This one is a no-brainer and it is all on us.

—SUSAN Marshall

Last modified Oct. 27, 2016

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